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Volume 39: Language and Linguistics
Article

RHETORICAL STRUCTURE AND READER MANIPULATION IN AGATHA CHRISTIE’S MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS


Marc Alexander

This paper describes Agatha Christie’s use of rhetoric to convince readers of the ‘truth’ of her detective’s solution in The Murder on the Orient Express, and uses an adaptation of Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST) designed for analyses of long extracts of a narrative text. The paper aims to demonstrate firstly the rhetorical practice of Christie, and secondly to demonstrate a tabular, non-diagrammatic exposition of RST, with some suggestions for future alterations to this method.

Key words: rhetoric, stylistics, Rhetorical Structure Theory, detective fiction, Agatha Christie.

 

 
Article

TITLES OR HEADLINES? ANTICIPATING CONCLUSIONS IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH ARTICLE TITLES AS A PERSUASIVE JOURNALISTIC STRATEGY TO ATTRACT BUSY READERS


Mercedes Jaime Sisó

This paper evidences the progressive adoption of a journalistic approach in title writing in certain scientific fields and suggests the reasons why this evolution has not affected all disciplines. The study is based on an analysis of 8,000 scientific research articles published over the last 25 years. The corpus was carefully selected following the advice of scientific researchers from several university departments. Factors such as the position of the journals in their impact list and the multidisciplinary or specific profile of the publication were considered. The results indicate that anticipating the conclusions in the title has become common practice in experimental works of biomedical research. An analysis of the linguistic characteristics of these conclusive titles is included to identify their basic components. It is suggested that instruction on the use of journalistic strategies is advisable for non-native writers and readers of biomedical research articles in high- ranking publications.

Key words: scientific research paper titles, news value, journalistic strategies, anticipating conclusions, English for Academic Purposes.


 

 
Article

PUNCTUATION PRACTICE IN THE ANTIDOTARY IN G.U.L. MS HUNTER 513 (FF. 37V - 96V)


Teresa Marqués Aguado


The study of punctuation practices in Old and Middle English texts has been traditionally neglected by many scholars on the grounds of their apparent ambiguity and lack of consistency. As a consequence, punctuation has been silently modernised in editions of Old and Middle English texts. Yet, recent studies have shown that there is certain regularity in the insertion of punctuation marks, and different methods have been put forward to modernise punctuation when required.

The aim of this article is to analyse the punctuation system of the Antidotary contained in Glasgow University Library, MS Hunter 513 (ff.37v - 96v). To this end, the uses of each punctuation mark will be discussed and classified in terms of the function they display. In view of these uses, functional equivalents will be proposed for the modernisation of its punctuation.


Key words: punctuation, Middle English, medicine, modernisation, Antidotary.

 

 
Article

“`BEOWULFO´, `GEATAS´, AND ’HEOROTO’: AN APPRAISAL OF THE EARLIEST RENDERINGS OF BEOWULF IN SPAIN


Eugenio M. Olivares Merino

Back in 1934, Beowulf entered the Spanish editorial world. Manuel Vallvé published in Barcelona a retelling of this Old English poem not intending it for scholars or professors, but rather for children. Ever since then and up to 1975, the year of General Franco’s death, two translations of Beowulf, as well as a second version for kids were published in Spain.
These texts are indirect indicators of the evolution of medieval English studies in this country and provide useful insights into the socio-historical background in which they were written. In the present paper I intend to contextualize these four texts in their ideological background. I will show how the Spanish versions of Beowulf were (un)consciously used by their authors mainly in two ways: either as a response to the dominant ideology, or as channels of transmission and reinforcement of the political establishment. Such a reappraisal has not been made up to now, and I consider it is badly needed given the level of maturity reached
by Old English studies in English Departments at Spanish universities at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Key words: Beowulf, translation, ideology, Beowulfo, nationalistic appropriation.

 

 
Review

Culturally Speaking: Culture, Communication and Politeness Theory.

SPENCER-OATEY, H. (ed.)

London and New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2008.

(by Lucía Fernández Amaya, Universidad Pablo de Olavide (Sevilla)

Full Text / Texto Completo